Branding and re-branding

Ramifications continue over the Co-operative Group’s decision to re-re-brand, away from the ‘national’ The Co-operative brand they had previously effectively spearheaded. I understand that Co-operative Group members will shortly get replacement turquoise cards for the standard yellow honeycomb cards which have been issued up to now.  Which is fine, but could create no end of confusion if Group members are also members of independent regional societies which themselves issue honeycomb cards. Letters are now going out to people in this situation, trying to explain what’s happening. Poor old regionals.

Is there anything positive in all this?  Just possibly, if it means that the regional societies are able to reaffirm their own independence from the Group as autonomous member-owned co-ops, something which was very difficult under the previous combined brand.

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The coop brand: a case of blowing in the wind?

I have on my desk details of the forthcoming Co-operative Group AGM, a leaflet from the independent regional Midcounties society about their AGM, and some material that’s come through from the (also independent) Phone Co-op.

But it’s hard to tell the bits of paper apart. All three use the “The Co-operative” national cooperative branding, originally introduced with great fanfare (remember the hype over the Blowin’ in the Wind soundtrack for the TV advert?) as a way of updating British coops’ (collective) tired image. At the time this seemed to me a sign that things were moving forward.

The shared brand raises issues, however. Firstly, if you shop in a branded Co-operative store it can be very hard to know whether you’re in part of the Co-operative Group’s empire, or in a store run by one of the independents such as Midcounties, Central England or Southern that have adopted the brand. Often only the till receipt will tell you. This doesn’t seem a good way of encouraging member identification with their own society. It’s almost as though all building societies had chosen to dispense with their own signs and agreed to share a collective “The Building Society” identity.

Then there’s the problem that the some businesses (Co-operative Bank, Co-operative Pharmacy and Co-operative Travel) which were once part of the Group but which are now owned outside the movement and in no sense are any longer cooperatives continue to use the branding.

All in all, regional societies such as the Lincolnshire which chose to stick with their own logos may be feeling just a little smug.

I see that the question of the future of the brand – the rights to which are held by the Co-operative Group – is one of the motions up for debate at the Group’s AGM on May 16. The motion calls on the Group to recognise that it hold the brand rights ‘as custodian on behalf of the whole movement’. It’s an important issue: I’ll be interested to see how the debate goes.